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Regions

Kabak

Kabak Valley is one of the most beautiful valleys, at the Aegean Coast of Turkey, embedded between the sea and the Torus Mountains  range and untouched by tourism. A jewel in a crown of wonderful scenery and peacefulness. Just 10 miles (around 15km) from the tourist resorts of Ölüdeniz, and Hisarönü.

The Lycian Path is an ancient long distance trekking route from Fethiye to Antalya and I am a little puzzled at why it takes this detour. Then on hindsight, maybe someone discovered the beauty of this coast and decided this is where the path would go.

Kabak is an unspoilt village, with the number of houses being counted on one hand, and is the last place to be reached by car or dolmuş from Ölüdeniz. As you reach the end of the road, there is a restaurant at the top of the Lycian Path, called The Olive Tree. It is the sort of place that you hope no one else finds, except you also want the businesses to flourish. Turkish law protects the valley, and a big hotel project, thankfully, was stopped several years ago.

 

Fethiye

Fethiye is one of Turkey's well-known tourist centres and is especially popular during the summer.

In the last ten years Fethiye has become a magnet for British citizens. Apart from its climate and natural beauty, the Britons are attracted by its less expensive lifestyle and the hospitality of the local people. The British population in Turkey is between 34,000 and 38,000. As a result of the large British population and the high numbers of Britons going there for holiday, Fethiye-Öludeniz was chosen as the best tourism centre in the world by The Times and The Guardian newspapers in 2007. Over 7,000 British citizens permanently live in Fethiye, while approximately 600,000 British tourists visit the town every summer.

 

Oludeniz

Ölüdeniz (official translation name Blue Lagoon, literally Dead Sea; because of being calm even during storms) is a small resort village in the Fethiye district which is in the Muğla Province the South West coast of Turkey on the Aegean Sea to the south and the high, steep sided Babadağ Mountain, 14 km (9 mi) south of Fethiye. The town is a beach resort.

Ölüdeniz remains one of the most photographed beaches on the Mediterranean. It has a secluded sandy bay at the mouth of Ölüdeniz, on a blue lagoon.[1] The beach itself is a pebble beach. The lagoon is a national nature reserve and building is strictly prohibited[2]. Ölüdeniz is famous for its shades of turquoise and aquamarine, and is an official blue flag beach, and is frequently rated among the top 5 beaches in the world by travelers and tourism journals alike. The resort is also famous for its paragliding opportunities. It is regarded as one of the best places in the world to paraglide due to its unique panoramic views, and the Babadağ Mountain's exceptional height.

 

Saklikent

Saklıkent Canyon is located in Muğla province in Turkey, 50 km from the city of Fethiye. The Canyon is 300 meters deep and 18 km long, one of the deepest in the world, resulting from the abrasion of the rocks by flowing waters over thousands of years. As the level of water rises during winter months, visitors can enter the canyon only in the summer. Four kilometers of the canyon are walkable after April, when most of the snow in the Taurus Mountains has melted and passed through on its way to the Mediterranean Sea. Saklıkent means "hidden city" in Turkish.

 

Kayakoy

Modern English usage seems to be Karmylassos is a village 8 km south of Fethiye in southwestern Turkey where Anatolian Greek speaking Christians lived until approximately 1923. The ghost town, now preserved as a museum village, consists of hundreds of rundown but still mostly intact Greek-style houses and churches which cover a small mountainside and serve as a stopping place for tourists visiting Fethiye and nearby Ölüdeniz.

It was built on the site of the ancient city of Carmylessus in the 18th century. It experienced a renewal after nearby Fethiye (known as Makri) was devastated by an earthquake in 1856 and a major fire in 1885. After the Greco-Turkish War, Kayaköy was largely abandoned after a population exchange agreement was signed by the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923. Many of the buildings were damaged in the 1957 Fethiye earthquake.

 

Göcek

It was named "Kalimche" in ancient times, and is located between Fethiye – Telmessos in ancient times – and Dalyan – Caunos in ancient times. According to the legends, it is in the Göcek area that Icarus landed in the sea after his famous flight trying to escape from the tower where he was imprisoned. Göcek was used as a harbour for ships loading chrome ore collected from the mines under nearby mountains during the Ottoman period.

Today, Göcek hosts six significant marinas that serve the yacht tourism in the region: Club Marina, Skopea Marina, Municipality Marinas, Marinturk Göcek Village Port, Marinturk Göcek Exclusive and Port Göcek Marina. A prominent characteristic of the town is the fact that it harbors islands and coves located in a large and secluded bay. Owing to its location, it naturally enjoys a high potential for yacht tourism.